Top 10 Socarxiv Papers Today in Social And Behavioral Sciences


2.013 Mikeys
#1. The Pleasure Principle: Why (Some) People Develop a Taste for Politics
Alexander Wuttke
Often, citizens talk politics or watch political shows solely for the pleasure they derive from these activities. Yet, existing theories struggle to explain why (some) individuals engage with politics as an end in itself even if the behavior does not produce any separable instrumental value. Integrating psychological theories from motivation studies, this study deduces a need-based model of political motivation in order to explain intrinsic political engagement. The model proposes that intrinsic political motivation has roots in the seemingly apolitical processes of need satisfaction which are deeply ingrained in the human psyche. Providing a theoretical framework for existing political science findings, this study argues that citizens seek behaviors they previously experienced as pleasurable. Differences in intrinsic political motivation are therefore theorized to reflect whether political engagement was previously experienced as satisfying basic psychological needs which is argued to predict both whether and how individuals...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: The Pleasure Principle: Why (Some) People Develop a Taste for Politics https://t.co/e7OPCpUryY
Kunkakom: @donmoyn @MartinBaekgaard @NMvanLoon @LBoghAndersen @LGTummers @StevenVdWalle @JLPerrySPEA @UlrichThy @kjeldsen_anne Fascinating. I have also just conducted a much smaller survey-experiment that intended to induce autonomy-supportive and -thwarting experiences. Both inductions failed. https://t.co/ep3RK3e71S
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Authors: 1
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2.012 Mikeys
#2. Detecting the Effects of Early-Life Exposures: Why Fecundity Matters
Jenna Nobles, Amar Hamoudi
Prenatal exposures have meaningful effects on health across the lifecourse. Innovations in causal inference have shed new light on these effects. Here, we motivate the importance of innovation in the characterization of fecundity, and prenatal selection in particular. We argue that such innovation is crucial for expanding knowledge of the fetal origins of later life health. Pregnancy loss is common, responsive to environmental factors, and closely related to maternal and fetal health outcomes. As a result, selection into live birth is driven by many of the same exposures that shape the health trajectories of survivors. Lifecourse effects that are inferred without accounting for these dynamics may be significantly distorted by survival bias. We use a set of Monte Carlo simulations with realistic parameters to examine the implications of prenatal survival bias. We find that even in conservatively specified scenarios, true fetal origin effects can be underestimated by 50% or more. In contrast, effects of exposures that reduce the...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Detecting the Effects of Early-Life Exposures: Why Fecundity Matters https://t.co/HHe2P08cj3
je_nobles: Do you do research on early-life exposures? @HamoudiAmar and I made something that we hope can be a resource. It’s about prenatal cohort selection. paper: https://t.co/imqUqokqNC preprint: https://t.co/CS4asFmhaP 1/ https://t.co/upQ7zCJ9fl
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Sample Sizes : [10000, 1000, 100, 1000]
Authors: 2
Total Words: 13473
Unqiue Words: 3974

2.012 Mikeys
#3. Where do negative stereotypes come from? The case of Indian English in the USA
Ethan Kutlu, Caroline Wiltshire
Language attitudes inform social stereotyping, which in turn affects linguistic judgments (Fiske, Cuddy, & Glick, 2007). Nonstandard varieties are particularly subject to negative stereotypes, being evaluated as “less friendly” and “hard to understand” (Giles & Watson, 2013). Recent studies point out a critical public health problem found within communities of immigrants who speak nonstandard varieties: being linguistically targeted is shown to cause long-term depression in both adolescents and adults (Kim et al., 2011; Inman et al., 2015). In this study, we investigate attitudes towards Indian English, a variety of English spoken by one of the largest immigrant populations in the USA (approximately 2.4 million), to understand the roots of linguistic stereotyping towards this variety of English. We compared attitudes of American English speakers towards Indian English and British English. Our results show that while American English speakers do not explicitly indicate any communication problem with Indian English, they...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Where do negative stereotypes come from? The case of Indian English in the USA https://t.co/fl3homDfsA
ethankutlu: Here is my qualitative work with Dr. Caroline Wiltshire where we examined attitudes towards Indian English from a #raciolinguistic framework. This paper will be presented at the LSA's Annual meeting. A follow-up paper is already cooking https://t.co/YKfphPi0DT
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2.011 Mikeys
#4. Quantifying the Scientific Revolution
Benoît de Courson, Nicolas Baumard
The Scientific Revolution is one of the most important phenomena in human history. Yet it is ill understood, partly because of a lack of quantification. Here, we leverage large datasets of individual biographies to build national estimates of scientific production during the early modern period. While aggregate levels of national production are unsurprising, per capita estimates reveal striking differences across countries, with the two richest countries of the time (England and the United Provinces) being much more scientifically productive than the rest of Europe. Overall, our study demonstrates a strong association between scientific creativity and per capita income. We also show that scientific creativity is associated with other kinds of creative activities in philosophy, literature, music and the arts, suggesting a common underlying factor. Our results also challenge long-held hypotheses regarding the role of religion, universities, demography, and the printing press, and support the idea that economic development and rising...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Quantifying the Scientific Revolution https://t.co/wBqjvg8dYZ
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Authors: 2
Total Words: 10321
Unqiue Words: 3344

2.004 Mikeys
#5. Revisiting Causal Inference in Forced-Choice Conjoint Experiments: Identifying Preferences Net of Compositional Effects
Flavien Ganter
In forced-choice conjoint experiments, respondents choose between two options, each characterized by a set of randomized attributes. Political scientists and sociologists increasingly implement this kind of design, almost always to capture respondents’ preferences. In so doing, they routinely rely on a single quantity of interest—the average marginal component effect (AMCE). The AMCE, however, not only captures preferences, it also captures a compositional effect reflecting the distribution of the pool of options. As a result, when the goal is to infer preferences, as is almost always the case, the quantity estimated is not the quantity of interest. This paper shows why the AMCE does not identify preferences and proposes a novel estimand—the average marginal component effect on preferences (AMCEP)—designed for this purpose. It presents a general method for estimating this quantity and illustrates its use and interpretation by replicating a classic forced-choice conjoint experiment on attitudes toward immigrants.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Revisiting Causal Inference in Forced-Choice Conjoint Experiments: Identifying Preferences Net of Compositional Effects https://t.co/2jJc4qG0qE
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Sample Sizes : None.
Authors: 1
Total Words: 10918
Unqiue Words: 2494

2.004 Mikeys
#6. Human Origins 2021
Sergey Gavrilets, Peter J Richerson, Frans de Waal
We argue that research on human origins and our subsequent cultural and social evolution is vital not only for foundational scientific discovery but also for understanding, mitigating, and solving the most pressing challenges faced by our society. Advancing research on human origins and social complexity is also very timely given recent advances and emerging opportunities. Fully capitalizing on these requires a concerted transdisciplinary effort of researchers from a diverse set of disciplines. Success in this endeavor could yield tremendous gains for society.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Human Origins 2021 https://t.co/I1sjT2ME9F
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Authors: 3
Total Words: 2080
Unqiue Words: 1057

2.004 Mikeys
#7. Clustering Longitudinal Life-Course Sequences using Mixtures of Exponential-Distance Models
Keefe Murphy, Brendan Murphy, Raffaella Piccarreta, Isobel Claire Gormley
Sequence analysis is an increasingly popular approach for the analysis of life courses represented by an ordered collection of activities experienced by subjects over a given time period. Several criteria exist for measuring pairwise dissimilarities among sequences. Typically, dissimilarity matrices are employed as input to heuristic clustering algorithms, with the aim of identifying the most relevant patterns in the data. Here, we propose a model-based clustering approach for categorical sequence data. The technique is applied to a survey data set containing information on the career trajectories of a cohort of Northern Irish youths tracked between the ages of 16 and 22. Specifically, we develop a family of methods for clustering sequences directly, based on mixtures of exponential-distance models, which we call MEDseq. The use of the Hamming distance or weighted variants thereof as the distance metrics permits closed-form expressions for the normalising constant, thereby facilitating the development of an ECM algorithm for...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Clustering Longitudinal Life-Course Sequences using Mixtures of Exponential-Distance Models https://t.co/HhzzrrJRBv
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Authors: 4
Total Words: 14886
Unqiue Words: 3416

2.004 Mikeys
#8. ABMLS Pilot Report 2018-2019: Methodology and preliminary findings
Rosan van Niekerk, Arjen de Wit, Naresh Mathoera, Rene Bekkers
This report documents the development of the A Broader Mind Longitudinal Survey at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The survey is designed to track the personal, academic, civic, and professional development of students as they progress through their study program. We survey students at VU Amsterdam at least every year to measure the attitudes, values, skills and behaviors reflecting “A Broader Mind” among students at VU Amsterdam. The survey provides a barometer of student life: how are students doing with respect to civic‐mindedness, student engagement, professional orientation?
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: ABMLS Pilot Report 2018-2019: Methodology and preliminary findings https://t.co/gkTT5RC7Vt
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Sample Sizes : [598, 100, 19719, 911, 78215, 67, 1104, 201, 523, 426, 95, 201, 375, 606, 373, 201, 100, 974]
Authors: 4
Total Words: 3107
Unqiue Words: 2230

2.001 Mikeys
#9. Trump’s New Face of Power in America
Bob Hanke
This article proposes that the advent of Trumpism is a moment of danger that compels us to analyse the micropolitics of the present. In the first part, I describe the constellation that gave rise to Trumpism. In the second part, I introduce Goffman’s concept of face-work and suggest how it remains relevant for describing Trump’s aggressive face-work. In the third part, I take Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of faciality as a point of departure for understanding micro-fascism. As an abstract machine, Trump’s faciality opens up possibilities of authoritarian micropolitics around a messenger/disrupter in chief. It works in connection with a landscape and relative to a collective assemblage of enunciation that extracted a territory of perception and affect. In the micropolitics of the present, the defining feature of Trumpism is how the corrupt abuse of power beyond the constitutional rule of law and the counterforces limiting his potency have collided on an ominous, convulsive political reality TV show.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Trump's New Face of Power in America https://t.co/C19H3zuVlt
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2.001 Mikeys
#10. ASCII affect: A comparison of emoticons and facial expressions in affective priming
Brittney O'Neill
The effects of emoticons in textual computer-mediated communication (CMC) remain relatively unexplored. CMC researchers have suggested that emoticons behave much as do facial expressions in face-to-face interaction (e.g. Danet, Ruedenberg-Wright, & Rosenbaum-Tamari, 1997; Rezabek & Cochenour, 1998; Thompson & Foulger, 1996). Some fMRI research suggests, however, that there is not a direct neural correspondence between emoticons and facial expressions, but that emoticons play an important role in determining the positive or negative valence of an utterance (Yuasa, Saito, & Mukawa, 2011). Following the affective priming paradigm developed by Fazio, Sanbonmatsu, Powell, and Kardes (1986), this study explores the priming effects of emoticons vis-à-vis photographs of facial expression and emotional words on valence judgements of emotionally charged words. Significant main effects of age, prime valence, and target valence were found. There were also significant interactions between these three factors. Overall results...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: ASCII affect: A comparison of emoticons and facial expressions in affective priming https://t.co/yuovW5r5nN
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