Top 5 Socarxiv Papers Today in Social And Behavioral Sciences


2.04 Mikeys
#1. Rejecting white distraction: a critique of the white logic and white methods in academic publishing
Shantel Buggs, Jennifer Sims, Rory Kramer
This critical reply engages in a critique of the prominence of “white logic” and “white methods” (Zuberi and Bonilla-Silva 2008) in academic publishing. We assess how the construction and proliferation of white knowledge(s) shapes analysis and interpretation, argumentation, peer review, and ultimately, publication. We call for a rejection of what we name “white distraction” and encourage the academic community to move toward more inclusive and decolonial modes of thinking, reviewing, and publishing.
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MaxLiboiron: If this isn't #discardstudies I don't know what is! 'White knowledge(s) shapes analysis, argumentation, peer review & publication. We call for a rejection of “white distraction” & encourage inclusive & decolonial thinking, reviewing, publishing.' @sgbuggs https://t.co/saTBD0wrfg
sgbuggs: remember that catastrophe of an "article" on the limits and possibilities of BLM this summer? well me, @RavenclawSoc23 and @rory_kramer (w/ help from many others) wrote a critical reply that has just been accepted at ERS. you can read it on @socarxiv: https://t.co/kdVnaIHl6J
LM_Campbell: Bookmarking for reading: https://t.co/Bv8NuSc1kA" by Buggs et al. "We call for a rejection of what we name “white distraction” and encourage the academic community to move toward more inclusive and decolonial modes of thinking, reviewing, and publishing." h/t @MaxLiboiron
socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Rejecting white distraction: a critique of the white logic and white methods in academic publishing https://t.co/Regi35v5Ca
rory_kramer: Please read our comment on that ERS article this summer and "white distraction". https://t.co/rBDPk1cVel Working with @sgbuggs and @RavenclawSoc23 and others on this reaffirmed that sociologists can be brilliant, supportive, collaborative, and fun at the same time.
nedasoc: RT @rory_kramer: Please read our comment on that ERS article this summer and "white distraction". https://t.co/rBDPk1cVel Working with @s…
RavenclawSoc23: RT @rory_kramer: Please read our comment on that ERS article this summer and "white distraction". https://t.co/rBDPk1cVel Working with @s…
_Dr_Sus: RT @rory_kramer: Please read our comment on that ERS article this summer and "white distraction". https://t.co/rBDPk1cVel Working with @s…
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Sample Sizes : None.
Authors: 3
Total Words: 4125
Unqiue Words: 1689

2.009 Mikeys
#2. Bias from network misspecification under spatial dependence
Timm Betz, Scott J Cook, Florian M Hollenbach
The pre-specification of the network is one of the biggest hurdles for applied researchers in undertaking spatial analysis. In this letter, we demonstrate two results. First, we derive bounds for the bias in non-spatial models with omitted spatially-lagged predictors or outcomes. These bias expressions can be obtained without prior knowledge of the network, and are more informative than familiar omitted variable bias formulas. Second, we derive bounds for the bias in spatial econometric models with non-differential error in the specification of the weights matrix. Under these conditions, we demonstrate that an omitted spatial input is the limit condition of including a misspecificed spatial weights matrix. Simulated experiments further demonstrate that spatial models with a misspecified weights matrix weakly dominate non-spatial models. Our results imply that, where cross-sectional dependence is presumed, researchers should pursue spatial analysis even with limited information on network ties.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Bias from network misspecification under spatial dependence https://t.co/DNpAwJzWZO
fhollenbach: Self-Promotion alert: My colleagues Timm Betz, Scott Cook, and I have a new paper that just got cond. acceptance at Political Analysis: “Bias from network misspecification under spatial dependence”. preprint: https://t.co/il6zU1qVbL short thread 👇🏽1/3
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Sample Sizes : None.
Authors: 3
Total Words: 8344
Unqiue Words: 2070

2.003 Mikeys
#3. Cycles of Invisibility: The Limits of Transparency in Dealing with Scientific Misconduct
Felicitas Hesselmann, Martin Reinhart
Sanctions for plagiarism, falsification, and fabrication in research are primarily symbolic. This paper investigates sanctions for scientific misconduct and their preceding investigation processes as visible and legitimate symbols. Using three different data sources (retraction notices, expert interviews, survey of scientists), we show that sanctions for scientific misconduct operate within a cycle of visibility, in which sanctions are highly visible, while investigation and decision-making procedures remain mostly invisible. This corresponds to high levels of acceptance for sanctions in the scientific community, but rather low acceptance of the respective authorities. Such a punitivity in turn exacerbates confidentiality concerns, so that authorities become even more secretive. We argue that punitivity towards scientific misconduct is driven by such a cycle of invisibility.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Cycles of Invisibility: The Limits of Transparency in Dealing with Scientific Misconduct https://t.co/4pxVnz3KxE
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Authors: 2
Total Words: 0
Unqiue Words: 0

2.002 Mikeys
#4. The Patrimonial Turn In The American State
Jeffrey Broxmeyer
Donald Trump’s presidency represents a “patrimonial turn” in the American state. The trend is departure from modern experience, particularly the fusion of personal business and officeholding functions. Yet, governance by family and friends has deep historical roots. The nineteenth-century spoils system mixed public administration with party and personal business in a way that rhymes with recent developments. The Long Reagan Coalition’s project to deconstruct the administrative state has reopened the door to sweeping bureaucratic experimentation by political entrepreneurs like Trump and his appointees. Today, patrimonialism has emerged as a management vehicle to solve problems of collective action, binding together an unstable, and otherwise unlikely, political alliance. Debates on de-democratization in the United States would be well served by examining the implantation of patrimonialism in historical and comparative perspective.
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: The Patrimonial Turn In The American State https://t.co/OIOJhbNkGm
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Authors: 1
Total Words: 0
Unqiue Words: 0

1.997 Mikeys
#5. Between Stars and Stripes: Regions for American Healthcare Reform
Brian M Coyle
This paper helps to satisfy the need to analyze the expansion of government administration, called for by healthcare reform. The scale of any enterprise that attempts to cover the entire US is vast. Scale impacts administration. Management is constrained by supervision and learning. This is addressed with hierarchy. But as hierarchical layers increase, effectiveness diminishes. US healthcare delivery is in a state of flux. Proposed major reforms include "Medicare for All," which may extend a UK NHS-like program to all US residents, and a "Public Option" which may extend a government-run insurance program to US residents who choose it. Debate over these proposals has concerned costs. This paper analyses their administrative requirements. It finds these ignored in some plans, and explains why. Examples from other countries demonstrate how scale is managed in healthcare delivery, in smaller nations and some large ones. Administration of major medical reforms across the vast US market will take a decade or longer to roll-out. This...
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socarxivpapers: #SocArXiv: Between Stars and Stripes: Regions for American Healthcare Reform https://t.co/o7or1GpV9F
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Sample Sizes : None.
Authors: 1
Total Words: 20520
Unqiue Words: 5958

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