Top 10 Biorxiv Papers Today in Animal Behavior And Cognition


2.014 Mikeys
#1. The Bayesian Superorganism I: collective probability estimation
Edmund R Hunt, Nigel R Franks, Roland J Baddeley
Superorganisms such as social insect colonies are very successful relative to their non-social counterparts. Powerful emergent information processing capabilities would seem to contribute to their abundance, as they explore and exploit their environment collectively. In this series of three papers, we develop a Bayesian model of collective information processing, starting here with nest-finding, then examining foraging (part II) and externalised memories (pheromone territory markers) in part III. House-hunting Temnothorax ants are adept at discovering and choosing the best available nest site for their colony. Essentially, we propose that they estimate the probability each choice is best, and then choose the highest probability. Viewed this way, we propose that their behavioural algorithm can be understood as a sophisticated statistical method that predates recent mathematical advances by some tens of millions of years. Here, we develop a model of their nest finding that incorporates insights from approximate Bayesian computation...
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PavelProsselkov: "...approximate Bayesian computation as a model of collective estimation of alternative choices" https://t.co/3KhRIVibXf
charleskfisher: More ecosystem computing! "The Bayesian Superorganism I: collective probability estimation" by Edmund R Hunt, Nigel R Franks, and Roland J Baddeley https://t.co/gncPBILiA9
nickschurch: RT @biorxivpreprint: The Bayesian Superorganism I: collective probability estimation https://t.co/W3YgZqLope #bioRxiv
melancronico: RT @biorxivpreprint: The Bayesian Superorganism I: collective probability estimation https://t.co/W3YgZqLope #bioRxiv
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Sample Sizes : None.
Authors: 3
Total Words: 8971
Unqiue Words: 2788

1.989 Mikeys
#2. Information synergy: adding unambiguous quality information rescues social information use in ants
Tomer J. Czaczkes, John J. Beckwith, Anna-Lena Horsch
Animals have access to many alternative information sources when making decisions, such as private information (e.g. memory) and social information. Social insects make extensive use of social information. However, when intentional social information (e.g. pheromone trails in ants) conflicts with private information (e.g. route memories), insects often follow their private information. Why is this? We propose that an asymmetry in the type of information provided by these two information sources drives the neglect of social information: In ants, workers with certain information about the quality of a food source (memory) ignore valuable social information (pheromone trails) because the pheromone trails encode only a very ambiguous measure of food quality. This leads to a testable hypothesis: the addition of unambiguous quality information should rescue social information following. To test this, we trained ants to a poor quality (0.25M sucrose) food source, and then provided an alternative path along with either 1) no information,...
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Authors: 3
Total Words: 9246
Unqiue Words: 3154

0.0 Mikeys
#3. The Object Space Task for mice and rats
Lisa Genzel, Evelien Schut, Tim Schroeder, Ronny Eichler, Angela Gomez, Irene Navarro Lobato, Francesco Battaglia
Declarative memory encompasses representations of specific events as well as knowledge extracted by accumulation over multiple episodes. To investigate how these different sorts of memories are created, we developed a new behavioral task in rodents. The task consists of three distinct conditions (stable, overlapping, random). Rodents are exposed to multiple sample trials, in which they explore objects in specific spatial arrangements. In the stable condition, the locations are constant during all sample trials; in the test trial, one objects location is changed. In the random condition, object locations are presented in the sample phase without a specific spatial pattern. In the overlapping condition, one location is shared (overlapping) between all trials while the other location changes during sample trials. We show that in the overlapping condition, instead of only remembering the last sample trial, rodents form a cumulative memory of the sample trials. Here we could show that both mice and rats can accumulate information...
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hugospiers: RT @memorydynamics: Updated preprint on the Object Space task: now with twice the n and 5d test! https://t.co/JYef01cwGN with @evelien_schu…
battaglialab: RT @memorydynamics: Updated preprint on the Object Space task: now with twice the n and 5d test! https://t.co/JYef01cwGN with @evelien_schu…
L_Genzel: RT @memorydynamics: Updated preprint on the Object Space task: now with twice the n and 5d test! https://t.co/JYef01cwGN with @evelien_schu…
memorydynamics: RT @memorydynamics: Updated preprint on the Object Space task: now with twice the n and 5d test! https://t.co/JYef01cwGN with @evelien_schu…
evelien_schut: RT @memorydynamics: Updated preprint on the Object Space task: now with twice the n and 5d test! https://t.co/JYef01cwGN with @evelien_schu…
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Repository: score
User: MemDynLab
Language: Python
Stargazers: 0
Subscribers: 2
Forks: 1
Open Issues: 3
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Authors: 7
Total Words: 7753
Unqiue Words: 1949

0.0 Mikeys
#4. An Ishihara-style test of animal colour vision
Karen L Cheney, Naomi Green, Alexander Vibert, Misha Vorobyev, Justin N. Marshall, Daniel C Osorio, John A Endler
Colour vision mediates ecologically relevant tasks for many animals, such as mate choice, foraging and predator avoidance. However, our understanding of animal colour perception is largely derived from human psychophysics, even though animal visual systems differ from our own. Behavioural tests of non-human animals are required to understand how colour signals are perceived by them. Here we introduce a novel test of colour vision in animals inspired by the Ishihara colour charts, which are widely used to identify human colour deficiencies. These charts consist of dots that vary in colour, brightness and size, and are designed so that a numeral or letter is distinguishable from distractor dots for humans with normal colour vision. In our method, distractor dots have a fixed chromaticity (hue and saturation) but vary in luminance. Animals can be trained to find single target dots that differ from distractor dots in chromaticity. We provide Matlab code for creating these stimuli, which can be modified for use with different animals....
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vancedberg: New paper describing how adaptations of Ishihara colour blindness tests can be used as a powerful tool to investigate colour discrimination thresholds and visual modelling in animals. More exciting triggerfish science =D https://t.co/6bZMQr7hQH
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Authors: 7
Total Words: 7846
Unqiue Words: 2906

0.0 Mikeys
#5. Do city cachers store less? The effect of urbanization and exploration on spatial memory in individual scatter hoarders
Megan Joy Thompson, Julie Morand-Ferron
Urbanization has been shown to affect a variety of traits in animals, including their physiology, morphology, and behaviour, but it is less clear how cognitive traits are modified. Urban habitats contain artificially elevated food sources, such as bird feeders, that are known to affect the foraging behaviours of urban animals. As of yet however, it is not known whether urbanization and the abundance of supplemental food during the winter reduce caching behaviours and spatial memory in scatter hoarders. We aimed to examine individual variation in caching and spatial memory between and within urban and rural habitats to determine i) whether urban individuals cache less frequently and perform less accurately on a spatial task, and ii) explore, for the first time in scatter hoarders, whether slower explorers perform more accurately on a spatial task, indicating a speed-accuracy trade-off within individuals. We assessed spatial memory of wild-caught black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; N = 96) from 14 sites along an urban...
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biorxivpreprint: Do city cachers store less? The effect of urbanization and exploration on spatial memory in individual scatter hoarders https://t.co/mJ2GBqrHfn #bioRxiv
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Authors: 2
Total Words: 9338
Unqiue Words: 3129

0.0 Mikeys
#6. Boundary Strength Analysis: Combining colour pattern geometry and coloured patch visual properties for use in predicting behaviour and fitness
John A Endler, Gemma L Cole, Xandy Kranz
Colour patterns are used by many species to make decisions that ultimately affect their Darwinian fitness. Colour patterns consist of a mosaic of patches that differ in geometry and visual properties. Although traditionally pattern geometry and colour patch visual properties are analysed separately, these components are likely to work together as a functional unit. Despite this, the combined effect of patch visual properties, patch geometry, and the effects of the patch boundaries on animal visual systems, behaviour and fitness are relatively unexplored. Here we describe Boundary Strength Analysis (BSA), a novel way to combine the geometry of the edges (boundaries among the patch classes) with the receptor noise estimate (ΔS) of the intensity of the edges. The method is based upon known properties of vertebrate and invertebrate retinas. The mean and SD of ΔS of a colour pattern can be obtained by weighting each edge class ΔS by its length, separately for chromatic and achromatic ΔS. This assumes those colour patterns, or parts of...
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biobiiana: "Boundary Strength Analysis: Combining colour pattern geometry and coloured patch visual properties for use in predicting behaviour and fitness" —> New #colsci method to combine geometry of edges with receptor noise estimates #JAEndler @GemmaLCole https://t.co/Ivd56yL1XK
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Sample Sizes : [9]
Authors: 3
Total Words: 12196
Unqiue Words: 3572

0.0 Mikeys
#7. The evolution of a beneficial association between an animal and a microbial community
Darren Rebar, Helen C Leggett, Sue M.L. Aspinall, Ana Duarte, Rebecca M Kilner
Many of the microbial communities associated with animals are known to enhance animal fitness. Yet relatively little is known about how these beneficial associations might have evolved in the first place. We investigated this problem with an experiment on burying beetles, Nicrophorus vespilloides, which breed on the body of a small dead vertebrate. We found that burying beetles breeding on germ-free mice produced smaller larvae than those breeding on conventional germ-laden mice. Thus, burying beetles gain benefits from the microbial community associated with their carrion breeding resource, because they lose fitness when this community is removed experimentally. Our experiment suggests that a symbiosis between an animal and a microbial community might begin as an adaptation to the microbial ecosystem in which the animal lives, even when these microbes exist outside the animal, are transiently associated with it at each generation and are not directly transmitted from parents to offspring.
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Authors: 5
Total Words: 3673
Unqiue Words: 1240

0.0 Mikeys
#8. Quantitative analysis reveals the basic behavioural repertoire of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis.
Jerneja Rudolf, Daniel Dondorp, Louise Canon, Sonia Tieo, Marios Chatzigeorgiou
Quantitative analysis of animal behaviour in model organisms is becoming an increasingly essential approach for tackling the great challenge of understanding how activity in the brain gives rise to behaviour. In addition, behavioural analysis can provide insight on the molecular basis of nervous system development and function as demonstrated by genetic screens focused on behavioural phenotyping in some genetically tractable model organisms. The progress in building low-cost automated tracking setups, together with advances in computer vision machine learning have expanded the repertoire of organisms which are amenable to quantitative behavioural analysis. Here we used automated image-based tracking to extract behavioural features from an organism of great importance in understanding the evolution of chordates, the free swimming larval form of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis which has a compact and fully mapped nervous system composed of only 231 neurons. We analysed hundreds of videos of larvae and we extracted basic geometric...
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PavelProsselkov: "...mapping behaviour to specific neurons of this compact chordate nervous system (Ciona int.) and it paves the way for comparative quantitative behavioural studies as a means to reconstruct the evolution of behaviour, especially in the chordate lineage" https://t.co/qNRm4MXRpa
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Authors: 5
Total Words: 16476
Unqiue Words: 5577

0.0 Mikeys
#9. Grouping effects in numerosity perception under prolonged viewing conditions
Leo Poom, Marcus Lindskog, Anders Winman, Ronald van den Berg
Humans can estimate numerosities – such as the number sheep in a flock – without deliberate counting. A number of biases have been identified in these estimates, which seem primarily rooted in the spatial organization of objects (grouping, symmetry, etc). Most previous studies used static stimuli with extremely brief exposure times. However, outside the laboratory, visual scenes are often dynamic and freely viewed for prolonged durations (e.g., a flock of moving sheep). The purpose of the present study is to examine the effect of grouping on perceived numerosity in stimuli that more closely mimic these conditions. To this end, we designed two experiments with limited-dot-lifetime displays (LDDs), in which each dot is visible for a brief period of time and replaced by a new dot elsewhere after its disappearance. The dynamic nature of LDDs prevents subjects from counting even when they are free-viewing a stimulus under prolonged presentation. Subjects estimated the number of dots in arrays that were presented either as a single...
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Authors: 4
Total Words: 9037
Unqiue Words: 2586

0.0 Mikeys
#10. Memory Image Completion (MIC): Establishing a task to behaviorally assess pattern completion in humans
Paula Vieweg, Martin Riemer, David Berron, Thomas Wolbers
For memory retrieval, pattern completion is a crucial process that restores memories from partial or degraded cues. Neurocognitive aging models suggest that the aged memory system is biased toward pattern completion, resulting in a behavioral preference for retrieval over encoding of memories. While there are behavioral tasks to assess the encoding side of these memory differences, pattern completion has received less attention in the literature. Here, we built on our previously developed behavioral recognition memory paradigm - the Memory Image Completion task (MIC) - a task to specifically target pattern completion. First, we used the original design with concurrent eye-tracking in order to rule out perceptual confounds that could interact with recognition performance. Second, we developed parallel versions of the task to accommodate test settings in clinical environments or longitudinal studies. The results show that older adults have a deficit in pattern completion ability with a concurrent bias toward pattern completion - a...
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Sample Sizes : [18]
Authors: 4
Total Words: 12073
Unqiue Words: 3060

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