Top 10 Arxiv Papers Today in Neurons And Cognition


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#1. Amanuensis: The Programmer's Apprentice
Thomas Dean, Maurice Chiang, Marcus Gomez, Nate Gruver, Yousef Hindy, Michelle Lam, Peter Lu, Sophia Sanchez, Rohun Saxena, Michael Smith, Lucy Wang, Catherine Wong
This document provides an overview of the material covered in a course taught at Stanford in the spring quarter of 2018. The course draws upon insight from cognitive and systems neuroscience to implement hybrid connectionist and symbolic reasoning systems that leverage and extend the state of the art in machine learning by integrating human and machine intelligence. As a concrete example we focus on digital assistants that learn from continuous dialog with an expert software engineer while providing initial value as powerful analytical, computational and mathematical savants. Over time these savants learn cognitive strategies (domain-relevant problem solving skills) and develop intuitions (heuristics and the experience necessary for applying them) by learning from their expert associates. By doing so these savants elevate their innate analytical skills allowing them to partner on an equal footing as versatile collaborators - effectively serving as cognitive extensions and digital prostheses, thereby amplifying and emulating their...
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kreinba: RT @nmfeeds: [O] https://t.co/IbqTxWQRlm Amanuensis: The Programmer's Apprentice. This document provides an overview of the material co...
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Authors: 12
Total Words: 18883
Unqiue Words: 5218

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#2. Deep Semantic Architecture with discriminative feature visualization for neuroimage analysis
Arna Ghosh, Fabien dal Maso, Marc Roig, Georgios D Mitsis, Marie-Hélène Boudrias
Neuroimaging data analysis often involves \emph{a-priori} selection of data features to study the underlying neural activity. Since this could lead to sub-optimal feature selection and thereby prevent the detection of subtle patterns in neural activity, data-driven methods have recently gained popularity for optimizing neuroimaging data analysis pipelines and thereby, improving our understanding of neural mechanisms. In this context, we developed a deep convolutional architecture that can identify discriminating patterns in neuroimaging data and applied it to electroencephalography (EEG) recordings collected from 25 subjects performing a hand motor task before and after a rest period or a bout of exercise. The deep network was trained to classify subjects into exercise and control groups based on differences in their EEG signals. Subsequently, we developed a novel method termed the cue-combination for Class Activation Map (ccCAM), which enabled us to identify discriminating spatio-temporal features within definite frequency bands...
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nmfeeds: [AI] https://t.co/JPFkBl1okc Deep Semantic Architecture with discriminative feature visualization for neuroimage analysis....
nmfeeds: [O] https://t.co/JPFkBl1okc Deep Semantic Architecture with discriminative feature visualization for neuroimage analysis. ...
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Sample Sizes : [13, 12]
Authors: 5
Total Words: 6508
Unqiue Words: 2047

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#3. fMRI Semantic Category Decoding using Linguistic Encoding of Word Embeddings
Subba Reddy Oota, Naresh Manwani, Bapi Raju S
The dispute of how the human brain represents conceptual knowledge has been argued in many scientific fields. Brain imaging studies have shown that the spatial patterns of neural activation in the brain are correlated with thinking about different semantic categories of words (for example, tools, animals, and buildings) or when viewing the related pictures. In this paper, we present a computational model that learns to predict the neural activation captured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of test words. Unlike the models with hand-crafted features that have been used in the literature, in this paper we propose a novel approach wherein decoding models are built with features extracted from popular linguistic encodings of Word2Vec, GloVe, Meta-Embeddings in conjunction with the empirical fMRI data associated with viewing several dozen concrete nouns. We compared these models with several other models that use word features extracted from FastText, Randomly-generated features, Mitchell's 25 features [1]. The...
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Authors: 3
Total Words: 5159
Unqiue Words: 1901

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#4. Towards Modeling the Interaction of Spatial-Associative Neural Network Representations for Multisensory Perception
German I. Parisi, Jonathan Tong, Pablo Barros, Brigitte Röder, Stefan Wermter
Our daily perceptual experience is driven by different neural mechanisms that yield multisensory interaction as the interplay between exogenous stimuli and endogenous expectations. While the interaction of multisensory cues according to their spatiotemporal properties and the formation of multisensory feature-based representations have been widely studied, the interaction of spatial-associative neural representations has received considerably less attention. In this paper, we propose a neural network architecture that models the interaction of spatial-associative representations to perform causal inference of audiovisual stimuli. We investigate the spatial alignment of exogenous audiovisual stimuli modulated by associative congruence. In the spatial layer, topographically arranged networks account for the interaction of audiovisual input in terms of population codes. In the associative layer, congruent audiovisual representations are obtained via the experience-driven development of feature-based associations. Levels of congruency...
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nmfeeds: [O] https://t.co/txqpEun3OD Towards Modeling the Interaction of Spatial-Associative Neural Network Representations for Mul...
nmfeeds: [NE] https://t.co/txqpEun3OD Towards Modeling the Interaction of Spatial-Associative Neural Network Representations for Mu...
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Authors: 5
Total Words: 3148
Unqiue Words: 1121

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#5. Predicting Task and Subject Differences with Functional Connectivity and BOLD Variability
Garren Gaut, Xiangrui Li, Brandon Turner, William A. Cunningham, Zhong-Lin Lu, Mark Steyvers
Previous research has found that functional connectivity (FC) can accurately predict the identity of a subject performing a task and the type of task being performed. We replicate these results using a large dataset collected at the OSU Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Brain Imaging. We also introduce a novel perspective on task and subject identity prediction: BOLD Variability (BV). Conceptually, BV is a region-specific measure based on the variance within each brain region. BV is simple to compute, interpret, and visualize. We show that both FC and BV are predictive of task and subject, even across scanning sessions separated by multiple years. Subject differences rather than task differences account for the majority of changes in BV and FC. Similar to results in FC, we show that BV is reduced during cognitive tasks relative to rest.
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Authors: 6
Total Words: 10884
Unqiue Words: 3016

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#6. Dynamic reshaping of functional brain networks during visual object recognition
J. Rizkallah, P. Benquet, A. Kabbara, O. Dufor, F. Wendling, M. Hassan
Emerging evidence shows that the modular organization of the human brain allows for better and efficient cognitive performance. Many of these cognitive functions are very fast and occur in subsecond time scale such as the visual object recognition. Here, we investigate brain network modularity while controlling stimuli meaningfulness and measuring participant reaction time. We particularly raised two questions: i) does the dynamic brain network modularity change during the recognition of meaningful and meaningless visual images? And ii) is there a correlation between network modularity and the reaction time of participants? To tackle these issues, we collected dense electroencephalography (EEG, 256 channels) data from 20 healthy human subjects performing a cognitive task consisting of naming meaningful (tools, animals) and meaningless (scrambled) images. Functional brain networks in both categories were estimated at subsecond time scale using the EEG source connectivity method. By using multislice modularity algorithms, we tracked...
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Authors: 6
Total Words: 6841
Unqiue Words: 2370

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#7. Storing and retrieving long-term memories: cooperation and competition in synaptic dynamics
Anita Mehta
We first review traditional approaches to memory storage and formation, drawing on the literature of quantitative neuroscience as well as statistical physics. These have generally focused on the fast dynamics of neurons; however, there is now an increasing emphasis on the slow dynamics of synapses, whose weight changes are held to be responsible for memory storage. An important first step in this direction was taken in the context of Fusi's cascade model, where complex synaptic architectures were invoked, in particular, to store long-term memories. No explicit synaptic dynamics were, however, invoked in that work. These were recently incorporated theoretically using the techniques used in agent-based modelling, and subsequently, models of competing and cooperating synapses were formulated. It was found that the key to the storage of long-term memories lay in the competitive dynamics of synapses. In this review, we focus on models of synaptic competition and cooperation, and look at the outstanding challenges that remain.
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SaifurRahmanMah: RT @BioPapers: Storing and retrieving long-term memories: cooperation and competition in synaptic dynamics. https://t.co/RTCAUkylVR
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Authors: 1
Total Words: 14106
Unqiue Words: 3728

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#8. Chromatic transitions in the emergence of syntax networks
Bernat Corominas-Murtra, Martí Sànchez Fibla, Sergi Valverde, Ricard Solé
The emergence of syntax during childhood is a remarkable example of how complex correlations unfold in nonlinear ways through development. In particular, rapid transitions seem to occur as children reach the age of two, which seems to separate a two-word, tree-like network of syntactic relations among words from a scale-free graphs associated to the adult, complex grammar. Here we explore the evolution of syntax networks through language acquisition using the {\em chromatic number}, which captures the transition and provides a natural link to standard theories on syntactic structures. The data analysis is compared to a null model of network growth dynamics which is shown to display nontrivial and sensible differences. In a more general level, we observe that the chromatic classes define independent regions of the graph, and thus, can be interpreted as the footprints of incompatibility relations, somewhat as opposed to modularity considerations.
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Authors: 4
Total Words: 5547
Unqiue Words: 1881

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#9. Task-Driven Convolutional Recurrent Models of the Visual System
Aran Nayebi, Daniel Bear, Jonas Kubilius, Kohitij Kar, Surya Ganguli, David Sussillo, James J. DiCarlo, Daniel L. K. Yamins
Feed-forward convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are currently state-of-the-art for object classification tasks such as ImageNet. Further, they are quantitatively accurate models of temporally-averaged responses of neurons in the primate brain's visual system. However, biological visual systems have two ubiquitous architectural features not shared with typical CNNs: local recurrence within cortical areas, and long-range feedback from downstream areas to upstream areas. Here we explored the role of recurrence in improving classification performance. We found that standard forms of recurrence (vanilla RNNs and LSTMs) do not perform well within deep CNNs on the ImageNet task. In contrast, custom cells that incorporated two structural features, bypassing and gating, were able to boost task accuracy substantially. We extended these design principles in an automated search over thousands of model architectures, which identified novel local recurrent cells and long-range feedback connections useful for object recognition. Moreover,...
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CKPYT: Task-Driven Convolutional Recurrent Models of the Visual System https://t.co/zyEV2oMId8 https://t.co/1q79IU3jkN
sunw37: @KordingLab @tyrell_turing @IntuitMachine These partial knowledge are sufficient&crucial at inspiring convnets initially. Of course as we learn more about the brain, we constantly modify our network architecture, eg. adding active dendrites to neurons & adding complexities to convnets https://t.co/UUCWl7Ld0O
arxiv_cscv: Task-Driven Convolutional Recurrent Models of the Visual System https://t.co/FZPNjou1lj
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Authors: 8
Total Words: 8050
Unqiue Words: 2477

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#10. Human peripheral blur is optimal for object recognition
R. T. Pramod, Harish Katti, S. P. Arun
Our eyes sample a disproportionately large amount of information at the centre of gaze with increasingly sparse sampling into the periphery. This sampling scheme is widely believed to be a wiring constraint whereby high resolution at the centre is achieved by sacrificing spatial acuity in the periphery. Here we propose that this sampling scheme may be optimal for object recognition because the relevant spatial content is dense near an object and sparse in the surrounding vicinity. We tested this hypothesis by training deep convolutional neural networks on full-resolution and foveated images. Our main finding is that networks trained on images with foveated sampling show better object classification compared to networks trained on full resolution images. Importantly, blurring images according to the human blur function yielded the best performance compared to images with shallower or steeper blurring. Taken together our results suggest that, peripheral blurring in our eyes may have evolved for optimal object recognition, rather...
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cynicalsecurity: R.T. Pramod et al., “Human peripheral blur is optimal for object recognition” https://t.co/pJ5R4lsMfr
WittTwitt: #foveation #notabugafeature https://t.co/9sDj555SfY
nmfeeds: [CV] https://t.co/ntZJy7srwk Human peripheral blur is optimal for object recognition. Our eyes sample a disproportionately...
jarson_jarson: I’m always amazed how great example of #biomimicry are neural networks. Check out this very interesting paper on arXiv proving that peripheral blurring in our eyes has most likely evolved for optimal object recognition. #ml #ai #cv https://t.co/dieRhvAfqr https://t.co/LcAhLQpYmo
atlytle: https://t.co/JqfXifdC0y
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Authors: 3
Total Words: 3622
Unqiue Words: 1223

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