Top 10 Arxiv Papers Today in Astrophysics


2.137 Mikeys
#1. The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in Gaia DR2
G. Torrealba, V. Belokurov, S. E. Koposov, T. S. Li, M. G. Walker, J. L. Sanders, A. Geringer-Sameth, D. B. Zucker, K. Kuehn, N. W. Evans, W. Dehnen
We report the discovery of a Milky-Way satellite in the constellation of Antlia. The Antlia 2 dwarf galaxy is located behind the Galactic disc at a latitude of $b\sim 11^{\circ}$ and spans 1.26 degrees, which corresponds to $\sim2.9$ kpc at its distance of 130 kpc. While similar in extent to the Large Magellanic Cloud, Antlia~2 is orders of magnitude fainter with $M_V=-8.5$ mag, making it by far the lowest surface brightness system known (at $32.3$ mag/arcsec$^2$), $\sim100$ times more diffuse than the so-called ultra diffuse galaxies. The satellite was identified using a combination of astrometry, photometry and variability data from Gaia Data Release 2, and its nature confirmed with deep archival DECam imaging, which revealed a conspicuous BHB signal in agreement with distance obtained from Gaia RR Lyrae. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy using AAOmega on the AAT to measure the dwarf's systemic velocity, $290.9\pm0.5$km/s, its velocity dispersion, $5.7\pm1.1$ km/s, and mean metallicity, [Fe/H]$=-1.4$. From these...
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cosmos4u: Astronomy really needed something like that ... an "enormous dwarf galaxy" - Antlia 2 is similar in extent to the Large Magellanic Cloud but orders of magnitude fainter: https://t.co/YfL73W8UZc
mmoyr: Just discovered: An enormous galaxy (about twice as big as the moon appears) orbiting the Milky Way. But it's incredibly faint. https://t.co/ftcdw0GJVe
kevaba: Astronomers discover an enormous but dim dwarf galaxy orbiting our Milky Way Galaxy, using Gaia data: "The origin of this core may be consistent with aggressive feedback, or may even require alternatives to cold dark matter" https://t.co/J0LuPIKVWd
MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing discoveries from Torrealba et al. of Draco-mass galaxies with sizes that are a factor of 5-10 larger, hidden in the Milky Way! https://t.co/hcWhM2DgTw
8minutesold: A new satellite galaxy of the Milky Way has been discovered using Gaia DR2 data: Antlia 2. It is pretty weird: the lowest-surface brightness satellite known, and apparently living in one of the lowest-density DM halos, too. https://t.co/ZpiL2jOfDl What about VPOS? MOND? Thread👇 https://t.co/GcQMDUGurg
Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report the discovery [using a combination of astrometry, photometry and variability] of a Milky-Way satellite in the constellation of Antlia [at a distance of 130 kpc]" https://t.co/O2YYBJGJNa
conselice: Interesting result - Gaia has found a dwarf galaxy which is 1.26 deg on the sky - over twice as big as the moon appears. However you'd never see it by eye, or even with deep imaging, given that this has a surface brightness of ~32. https://t.co/mMjx3MaVwi
AstroRoque: A new satellite of the Milky Way discovered with @ESAGaia, Antlia 2 dwarf galaxy, sets a new limit for the dimmest and most diffuse system known. https://t.co/T2mLbBrNQh Inferred orbit of Antlia 2, (Figure 8) https://t.co/gbU9W2ruvv
neuronomer: Brilliant paper by Torrealba et al. on arXiv today. Discovery of another satellite of the Milky Way! Is it controversial to think that the most convincing of these three plots is the proper-motion one? https://t.co/dURVpD3bIG https://t.co/NjcIe258aU
AsteroidEnergy: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
physicsmatt: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
CelineBoehm1: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
kevaba: RT @MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing disco…
fergleiser: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
nfmartin1980: RT @MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing disco…
Stoner_68: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
HansPrein: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
GaiaUB: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
marianojavierd1: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
galaxy_map: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
astroarianna: RT @MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing disco…
xurde69: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
sergiosanz001: RT @MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing disco…
yshalf: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
FernRoyal: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
CosmoCa3sar: RT @MBKplus: First there was the "feeble giant" (https://t.co/W4q9O7rTII). Now, the "hidden giant" (https://t.co/tUOmCNzQrV). Amazing disco…
DivakaraMayya: RT @AstroPHYPapers: The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in Gaia DR2. https://t.co/TW2SBSbhUn
real_vrocha: RT @Jos_de_Bruijne: "The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/OPKhM2PToj "We report th…
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Total Words: 18930
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2.029 Mikeys
#2. The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo
Ana Bonaca, David W. Hogg, Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Charlie Conroy
We present a model for the interaction of the GD-1 stellar stream with a massive perturber that naturally explains many of the observed stream features, including a gap and an off-stream spur of stars. The model involves an impulse by a fast encounter, after which the stream grows a loop of stars at different orbital energies. At specific viewing angles, this loop appears offset from the stream track. The configuration-space observations are sensitive to the mass, age, impact parameter, and total velocity of the encounter, and future velocity observations will constrain the full velocity vector of the perturber. A quantitative comparison of the spur and gap features prefers models where the perturber is in the mass range of $10^6\,\rm M_\odot$ to $10^8\,\rm M_\odot$. Orbit integrations back in time show that the stream encounter could not have been caused by any known globular cluster or dwarf galaxy, and mass, size and impact-parameter arguments show that it could not have been caused by a molecular cloud in the Milky Way disk....
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adamspacemann: This is exciting: astronomers think that a big glob of dark matter could be what disrupted stellar stream GD-1 around the Milky Way https://t.co/Mpdsqy755u
adrianprw: On the #arxiv today: evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo from the morphology of the GD-1 stream! https://t.co/hyTk9gKW8Y (led by @anabonaca w/ @davidwhogg, Charlie Conroy) and see https://t.co/lixElXikTf -- featuring @ESAGaia DR2 data!
Jos_de_Bruijne: "The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the #MilkyWay halo" https://t.co/w7AyuVzfYZ"We present a model for the interaction of the GD-1 stream with a perturber that naturally explains many of the observed stream features" #GaiaMission #GaiaDR2 https://t.co/FYgoSFf9iR
SaschaCaron: Hint for Dark Matter substructure from stellar streams ?https://t.co/ukobnoMVmQ
anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and privilege to work with @davidwhogg, @adrianprw, Charlie Conroy, and the @ESAGaia data.
AstroPHYPapers: The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo. https://t.co/D7D8uhctXU
scimichael: The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo https://t.co/Wa5dngzFQD
vancalmthout: RT @SaschaCaron: Hint for Dark Matter substructure from stellar streams ?https://t.co/ukobnoMVmQ
adrianprw: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
ReadDark: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
johngizis: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
nbody6: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
Jos_de_Bruijne: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
Motigomeman: RT @AstroPHYPapers: The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo. https://t.co/D7D8uhctXU
deniserkal: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
Katelinsaurus: RT @AstroPHYPapers: The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo. https://t.co/D7D8uhctXU
isalsalism: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
garavito_nico: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
JeffCarlinastro: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
gorankab: RT @anabonaca: The GD-1 stellar stream might have been perturbed by a dark, massive halo object: https://t.co/YKShO40dLv A pleasure and pri…
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2.021 Mikeys
#3. Contrast sensitivities in the Gaia Data Release 2
Alexis Brandeker, Gianni Cataldi
The source detection sensitivity of Gaia is reduced near sources. To characterise this contrast sensitivity is important for understanding the completeness of the Gaia data products, in particular when evaluating source confusion in less well resolved surveys, such as in photometric monitoring for transits. Here, we statistically evaluate the catalog source density to determine the Gaia Data Release 2 source detection sensitivity as a function of angular separation and brightness ratio from a bright source. The contrast sensitivity from 0.4 arcsec out to 12 arcsec ranges in DG = 0-14 mag. We find the derived contrast sensitivity to be robust with respect to target brightness, colour, source density, and Gaia scan coverage.
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Jos_de_Bruijne: "Contrast sensitivities in #GaiaDR2" https://t.co/NOWBumQutj "We statistically evaluate the catalog source density to determine the #GaiaDR2 source detection sensitivity as a function of angular separation and brightness ratio from a bright source" #GaiaMission https://t.co/8DiugeREgI
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Total Words: 2699
Unqiue Words: 1040

2.012 Mikeys
#4. Spectacular HST observations of the Coma galaxy D100 and star formation in its ram pressure stripped tail
William J. Cramer, Jeffrey D. P. Kenney, Ming Sun, Hugh Crowl, Masafumi Yagi, Pavel Jáchym, Elke Roediger, Will Waldron
We present new HST F275W, F475W, and F814W imaging of the region of the Coma cluster around D100, a spiral galaxy with a remarkably long and narrow ($60 \times 1.5$ kpc) ram pressure stripped gas tail. We find blue sources coincident with the H$\alpha$ tail, which we identify as young stars formed in the tail. We also determine they are likely to be unbound stellar complexes with sizes of $\sim$ $50-100$ pc, likely to disperse as they age. From a comparison of the colors and magnitudes of the young stellar complexes with simple stellar population models, we find ages ranging from $\sim$ $1-50$ Myr, and masses ranging from $10^3$ to $\sim$ $10^5$ M$_{\odot}$. We find the overall rate and efficiency of star formation are low, $\sim$ $6.0 \times \, 10^{-3}$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and $\sim$ $6 \, \times$ 10$^{-12}$ yr$^{-1}$ respectively. The total H$\alpha$ flux of the tail would correspond to a star formation rate $7$ times higher, indicating some other mechanism for H$\alpha$ excitation is dominant. From analysis of colors, we...
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emulenews: Spectacular HST observations of the Coma galaxy D100 and star formation in its ram pressure stripped tail https://t.co/WOHwC8iNcH https://t.co/zKjKYAq0mY
AstroPHYPapers: Spectacular HST observations of the Coma galaxy D100 and star formation in its ram pressure stripped tail. https://t.co/cMqv1UBWMd
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2.008 Mikeys
#5. Imprints of local lightcone projection effects on the galaxy bispectrum IV: Second-order vector and tensor contributions
Sheean Jolicoeur, Alireza Allahyari, Chris Clarkson, Julien Larena, Obinna Umeh, Roy Maartens
The galaxy bispectrum on scales around and above the equality scale receives contributions from relativistic effects. Some of these arise from lightcone deformation effects, which come from local and line-of-sight integrated contributions. Here we calculate the local contributions from the generated vector and tensor background which is formed as scalar modes couple and enter the horizon. We show that these modes are sub-dominant when compared with other relativistic contributions.
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RelativityPaper: Imprints of local lightcone projection effects on the galaxy bispectrum IV: Second-order vector and tensor contributions. https://t.co/r0cYjFrf0b
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Total Words: 6305
Unqiue Words: 1671

2.007 Mikeys
#6. How to measure galaxy star formation histories II: Nonparametric models
Joel Leja, Adam C. Carnall, Benjamin D. Johnson, Charlie Conroy, Joshua S. Speagle
Nonparametric star formation histories (SFHs) have long promised to be the "gold standard" for galaxy SED modeling as they are flexible enough to describe the full diversity of SFH shapes, whereas parametric models rule out a significant fraction of these shapes {\it a priori}. However, this flexibility isn't fully constrained even with high-quality observations, making it critical to choose a well-motivated prior. Here we use the SED-fitting code Prospector to explore the effect of different nonparametric priors by fitting SFHs to mock UV-IR photometry generated from a diverse set of input SFHs. First, we confirm that nonparametric SFHs recover input SFHs with less bias and return more accurate errors than parametric SFHs. We further find that while nonparametric SFHs robustly recover the overall shape of the input SFH, the primary determinant of the size and shape of the posterior SFR(t) is the choice of prior rather than the photometric noise. As a practical demonstration, we fit the UV-IR photometry of $\sim$6000 galaxies from...
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AstroPHYPapers: How to measure galaxy star formation histories II: Nonparametric models. https://t.co/INWR7ptgst
DivakaraMayya: RT @AstroPHYPapers: How to measure galaxy star formation histories II: Nonparametric models. https://t.co/INWR7ptgst
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Dynamic Nested Sampling package for computing Bayesian posteriors and evidences

Repository: dynesty
User: joshspeagle
Language: Python
Stargazers: 34
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Forks: 11
Open Issues: 8
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2.005 Mikeys
#7. Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914
Alex B. Nielsen, Alexander H. Nitz, Collin D. Capano, Duncan A. Brown
We use the Pearson cross-correlation statistic proposed by Liu and Jackson \cite{Liu:2016kib}, and employed by Creswell et al. \cite{Creswell:2017rbh}, to look for statistically significant correlations between the LIGO Hanford and Livingston detectors at the time of the binary black hole merger GW150914. We compute this statistic for the calibrated strain data released by LIGO, using both the residuals provided by LIGO and using our own subtraction of a maximum-likelihood waveform that is constructed to model binary black hole mergers in general relativity. To assign a significance to the values obtained, we calculate the cross-correlation of both simulated Gaussian noise and data from the LIGO detectors at times during which no detection of gravitational waves has been claimed. We find that after subtracting the maximum likelihood waveform there are no statistically significant correlations between the residuals of the two detectors at the time of GW150914.
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mpi_grav: You can also use @LIGO Open data to investigate possible excess correlations around #GW150914. @mpi_grav researchers did that together with colleagues in this new paper https://t.co/npIbAiD2XA. Have a look at https://t.co/8CeWYUKjjG, if you want to reproduce their results. https://t.co/uYT3eV8DiQ
AstroPHYPapers: Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914. https://t.co/iw7MDpVZC3
joseru: https://t.co/0e4iyqbLlb
emulenews: RT @AstroPHYPapers: Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914. https://t.co/iw7MDpVZC3
mwgc1995: RT @AstroPHYPapers: Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914. https://t.co/iw7MDpVZC3
Marianasasha: RT @AstroPHYPapers: Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914. https://t.co/iw7MDpVZC3
Github

Investigating the noise residuals around the gravitational wave event GW150914

Repository: gw150914_investigation
User: gwastro
Language: Jupyter Notebook
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2.004 Mikeys
#8. Probing the Inner Disk Emission of the Herbig Ae Stars HD 163296 and HD 190073
Benjamin R. Setterholm, John D. Monnier, Claire L. Davies, Alexander Kreplin, Stefan Kraus, Fabien Baron, Alicia Aarnio, Jean-Philippe Berger, Nuria Calvet, Michel Curé, Samer Kanaan, Brian Kloppenborg, Jean-Baptiste Le Bouquin, Rafael Millan-Gabet, Adam E. Rubinstein, Michael L. Sitko, Judit Sturmann, Theo A. ten Brummelaar, Yamina Touhami
The physical processes occurring within the inner few astronomical units of proto-planetary disks surrounding Herbig Ae stars are crucial to setting the environment in which the outer planet-forming disk evolves and put critical constraints on the processes of accretion and planet migration. We present the most complete published sample of high angular resolution H- and K-band observations of the stars HD 163296 and HD 190073, including 30 previously unpublished nights of observations of the former and 45 nights of the latter with the CHARA long-baseline interferometer, in addition to archival VLTI data. We confirm previous observations suggesting significant near-infrared emission originates within the putative dust evaporation front of HD 163296 and show this is the case for HD 190073 as well. The H- and K-band sizes are the same within $(3 \pm 3)\%$ for HD 163296 and within $(6 \pm 10)\%$ for HD 190073. The radial surface brightness profiles for both disks are remarkably Gaussian-like with little or no sign of the sharp edge...
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AliciaAarnio: Also authors: @AstroMonnier, @astrokraus, @bkloppenborg, and @TenTheoten! (Ben doesn't have twitter?) https://t.co/JeqJPh847x Probing the Inner Disk Emission of the Herbig Ae Stars HD 163296 and HD 190073 https://t.co/Ec5aN3HQsn
AstroPHYPapers: Probing the Inner Disk Emission of the Herbig Ae Stars HD 163296 and HD 190073. https://t.co/l1iNMm1n50
Github

Python module for OIFITS format

Repository: oifits
User: pboley
Language: Python
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2.003 Mikeys
#9. Black hole growth through hierarchical black hole mergers in dense star clusters: implications for gravitational wave detections
Fabio Antonini, Mark Gieles, Alessia Gualandris
In a star cluster with a sufficiently large escape velocity, black holes (BHs) that are produced by BH mergers can be retained, dynamically form new {BH} binaries, and merge again. This process can repeat several times and lead to significant mass growth. In this paper, we calculate the mass of the largest BH that can be formed through repeated mergers of stellar seed BHs and determine how its value depends on the physical properties of the host cluster. We adopt an analytical model in which the energy generated by the black hole binaries in the cluster core is assumed to be regulated by the process of two-body relaxation in the bulk of the system. This principle is used to compute the hardening rate of the binaries and to relate this to the time-dependent global properties of the parent cluster. We demonstrate that in clusters with initial escape velocity $\gtrsim 300\rm km\ s^{-1}$ in the core and density $\gtrsim 10^5\ M_\odot\rm pc^{-3}$, repeated mergers lead to the formation of BHs in the mass range $100-10^5 \,M_\odot$,...
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arxiv_org: Black hole growth through hierarchical black hole mergers in dense star clusters: implica... https://t.co/KIsHJb5MoP https://t.co/8tj6Pf4G8K
RelativityPaper: Black hole growth through hierarchical black hole mergers in dense star clusters: implications for gravitational wave detections. https://t.co/TLnTeA1v1A
avila71201798: RT @arxiv_org: Black hole growth through hierarchical black hole mergers in dense star clusters: implica... https://t.co/KIsHJb5MoP https:/…
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2.002 Mikeys
#10. An Adaptive Optics Survey of Stellar Variability at the Galactic Center
Abhimat Krishna Gautam., Tuan Do, Andrea M. Ghez, Mark R. Morris, Gregory D. Martinez, Matthew W. Hosek Jr., Jessica R. Lu, Shoko Sakai, Gunther Witzel, Siyao Jia, Eric E. Becklin, Keith Matthews
We present a $\approx 11.5$ year adaptive optics (AO) study of stellar variability and search for eclipsing binaries in the central $\sim 0.4$ pc ($\sim 10''$) of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster. We measure the photometry of 563 stars using the Keck II NIRC2 imager ($K'$-band, $\lambda_0 = 2.124 \text{ } \mu \text{m}$). We achieve a photometric uncertainty floor of $\Delta m_{K'} \sim 0.03$ ($\approx 3\%$), comparable to the highest precision achieved in other AO studies. Approximately half of our sample ($50 \pm 2 \%$) shows variability. $52 \pm 5\%$ of known early-type young stars and $43 \pm 4 \%$ of known late-type giants are variable. These variability fractions are higher than those of other young, massive star populations or late-type giants in globular clusters, and can be largely explained by two factors. First, our experiment time baseline is sensitive to long-term intrinsic stellar variability. Second, the proper motion of stars behind spatial inhomogeneities in the foreground extinction screen can lead to...
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AstroPHYPapers: An Adaptive Optics Survey of Stellar Variability at the Galactic Center. https://t.co/oRrSdQGiMg
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